Eric Bonsang, PhD

Visiting Research Fellow

Eric Bonsang is Associate Professor of Economics at Université Paris-Dauphine. He holds a PhD in Economics from University of Liège (2008). Eric is also a fellow of the Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA, Maastricht University), the Network for Studies on Pensions, Aging and Retirement (Netspar), and the Research Centre in Public Economics and Population Economics (CREPP, University of Liège). He is Associate Editor of Ageing & Society and the Journal of the Economics of Aging. His current research interests focus on applied microeconometrics, labor and demographic economics, and economics of aging, including the causes and consequences of cognitive aging, subjective well-being, and long-term care for older individuals.

 

Education

PhD, 2008, Economics, University of Liège

MsC, 2003, Economics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

BA, 2001, Economics, University of Liège

 

Selected Publications

Bonsang, E., Skirbekk, V., Staudinger, U. (2017) Dohmen, T. (2015). As You Sow, So Shall You Reap: Gender-Role Attitudes and Late-Life Cognition. Psychological Science, doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797617708634.

Bonsang, E., Dohmen, T. (2015). Risk attitude and cognitive aging. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, vol. 112, pp. 112-126.

Bonsang, E., Van Soest, A. (2015). Satisfaction with daily activities after retirement in Europe. Ageing & Society, 2015, vol. 35, n°6, pp. 1146-1170.

Grotz, C., Letenneur, L., Bonsang, E., Amieva, H., Meillon, C. Quertemont, E. Salmon, E. Adam, S. (2015). Retirement Age and the Age of Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the ICTUS Study. PLoS ONE, vol. 10, n°2, pp. 1-11.

Adam, S., Bonsang, E., Grotz, C., Perelman, S. (2013). Occupational activities and cognitive reserve: implications in terms of the prevention of cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical Interventions in Aging, vol. 8, pp. 377-390.

Skirbekk, V., Stonawski, M., Bonsang, E., Staudinger, U. (2013). The Flynn effect and population aging. Intelligence, vol. 41, n°3, pp. 169-177.